SC19 Proceedings

The International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage, and Analysis

U.S. Strategic Computing – An Update


Authors: Manish Parashar (National Science Foundation), Jake Taylor (Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP)), Bill Vanderlinde (US Department of Energy Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research), Barry Schneider (National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST))

Abstract: Under the auspices of the 2015 National Strategic Computing Initiative, U.S. government agencies have been working to maximize the benefits of high-performance computing for scientific discovery, economic competitiveness and national security. However, the scientific and technological landscapes are rapidly evolving, and it is time to revisit the goals and approaches needed to sustain and enhance leadership in strategic computing. To address this, the OSTP and NSTC’s NITRD Subcommittee have formed a Fast Track Action Committee (FTAC) on Strategic Computing to develop recommendations to advance leadership in strategic computing. This BoF will discuss FTAC's activities and findings with the community.

Long Description: Computing plays critical roles in all aspects of American life, from vacationers automatically tagging photographs with edge-based machine learning, to corporate supply chains being secured by advanced ledger technologies, to computing technologies deepening our understanding of science and engineering. The impact of strategic computing on the scientific and technological leadership of the US is undeniable. The United States has historically sustained a high-level of investment in specialized, high performance computing systems in order to maintain our scientific and economic leadership internally and on the international stage.

Since 2015, government agencies, under the auspices of the National Strategic Computing Initiative (NSCI), have been working to maximize the benefits of high-performance computing (HPC) for scientific discovery, economic competitiveness and national security. However, the technological and scientific landscape of HPC is evolving rapidly. As a result, it is time to revisit the goals and approaches needed to sustain and enhance U.S. leadership in strategic computing for the future.

To address this the Office of Science and Technology Policy and the National Science and Technology Council's Subcommittee on Networking and Information Technology Research and Development have formed a Fast Track Action Committee on Strategic Computing (FTAC) to develop recommendations to advance leadership in strategic computing for the Nation. The FTAC aims to guide strategic computing beyond exascale to meet future national scientific and technological challenges. This includes working with the community, via, for example, public-private partnerships, to address the most relevant topics in the emerging computing landscape such as new and potentially disruptive architectures, network-centric computing, cybersecurity, access to and curation of data, and software sustainability, which continue to present challenges and opportunities in advancing scientific computing. The FTAC must also address challenges in developing and sustaining a workforce to support the computational needs of the national innovation base and sustain the United States as a world leader in high-performance computing.

FTAC’s activities have included a Request for Information (RFI) as well as a Community of Interest workshop. The output of the FTAC's efforts will inform government research activities through and beyond the current era of computing.

The overarching goal of this BoF is to have a dialogue with the community about FTAC’s activities, findings and recommendations.




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